Truth or Trump?

I recently saw a headline that 43% of evangelicals think Donald Trump should be removed from office.  We know others who have declared him to be a modern-day Cirrus. I’ve had different opinions at different times but honestly,

I’ve never met the man. 

All I know is what I see, hear and read in the media.  

I write a blog for the Adventures in Missions GAP year squad that we coach called The Squirrel Pole.  A squirrel pole is a survival food trap that I learned about when I was a US Marine. 

Its based on the idea that everything in nature naturally takes the path of least resistance.  A squirrel is perfectly capable of running straight up a tree.  But place branch laden with wire nooses at an angle against the trunk and the stupid squirrel will hang itself every time.

Another squirrel poll upon which people hang themselves is the reliance on others to do their thinking for them.

I used to trade world currencies on the FOREX.

That’s when I learned the world is not the world I had learned about in school. It makes sense. The father of lies is the god of it.

As it turns out the average American’s world view is shaped by a media whose narrative is controlled by six corporations. That’s not just so called “fake news”. That’s all news.

The first thing I learned as a trader was, know your own biases, do your own analysis and emotion is the enemy of analysis. 

People are easily manipulated by what is commonly known as confirmation bias. Brokers leverage confirmation bias to take money away from nonprofessional traders who dream of getting rich quick.

They call these nonprofessionals “dumb money”.

This is how it works. The broker begins by “pumping” a stock or other financial instrument through internet and television. They tell everyone why “you’d better hurry before it’s too late because this one is a sure thing!” Dumb money is looking for a sure thing and hearing “it’s a sure thing” confirms what they want to hear. So, dumb money rushes in to buy before the price goes up. Of course, this drives the price up at warp speed. Dumber money tries to jump on the “moving train” and the price goes up faster until it hits a target predetermined by the broker who probably owns the biggest chunk.

When it hits the mark, the broker might short the stock or buy an “option” before closing his original position and collecting the profit. Of course, some of the dumb money sees the price action, panics and sells before they lose everything. That makes the price drop faster and more people jump off the “moving train” and sell to cover their losses. When the price gets low enough the original broker reverses his position and collects the profit from that trade too. This goes on all day every day that markets are open. What is important to understand is that media drama moves markets. While the public separates into tribes, fights with each other over what they believe is the correct moral side of what they think is the real issue; smart money is busy making money.

For example, gun control is always hot button issue pumped by the press. In June 2016 Barack Obama talked about a possible assault weapons ban. The media pumped a false pending executive order narrative. Guess what happened next? Gun lovers panicked. Assault weapons and ammunition sales went through the roof. Smart money made money again.

Confirmation bias makes lying easy. Confirmation bias makes us easy to manipulate.

World leaders have always used it to manipulate populations for their own gain.

Paul Joseph Goebbels was Adolf Hitler’s Minister of propaganda said;

“If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.”

Know your own confirmation biases.

Otherwise you’re sure to get played.

Why am I telling you all this in a missionary blog?

Adolf Hitler had motto.

“He alone, who owns the youth, gains the future.”

There is a huge cultural and spiritual war in progress for the hearts and minds of the generation that many of us refer to as youth. Some of you are youth.

The winner gets to determine “Truth”

Deception is the Devil’s number one game.

And Your emotions are a primary tool in Hell’s efforts to manipulate and control you.

In Mat 22 people were trying to trap Jesus into making a political statement about taxation, politics, and Rome so they could kill him.  It was a total set up.  But Jesus wasn’t dumb. Cesar’s image was on the money. So He said, “Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s; and to God the things that are God’s. 

 The question is; who’s image do you bear? 

If it’s God’s then shouldn’t you be rendering all of yourself onto Him?

I recently heard a preacher ask; “Why do we get so upset when we see the world acting like the world?”  That’s what the world does.  Even more; why are we so focused on changing the world by worldly means? 2 Tim 3 seems clear. Things are going to get worse before they get better. As Christians we are called to be in the world not of it. We are called to be Holy which means “set apart”.  We can argue politics all day.  But it doesn’t change anything. It only divides and divided kingdoms don’t stand.

By all means render onto Cesar what is Cesar’s and vote. Just be aware of your own confirmation bias and your own unreliable emotions.

That said, Jesus was clear.  He said “I am the way, the truth and the life.  No one comes to the Father except through me”. John 14:6  

Christians are ruining their witness everyday by getting angry over politics. Meanwhile PEOPLE ARE GOING TO HELL.

If you ask me we need to be telling people who Truth is and stop wasting our time fighting over who Trump is. 

At the end of the day we’re all dumb money when it comes to that.

Don’t be a Squirrel

On Horses and Donkeys

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Beware the whiles of the devil Eph 6:11

While short term mission trips are often characterized by “Mount of Transfiguration experiences”. They tend to be ripe with fresh revelation accompanied by a renewed sense of gratitude for everything they have back home.   Those involved in long term missions know the valley that Peter, James and John encountered in Mark 9:2-29.  That God is more concerned with our own character, than our projects can be a hard lesson to learn.

Chaos is a recurring motif in third world missions .

We were in crisis mode when we thought Honduras was about to break out into civil war and made contingency plans in the event we would have to protect and or evacuate 48 children in our care.  Soon after that passed, we had Honduran police storming our compound to take all of our files.  Why? Because a member of the body of Christ in the USA decided that IMI was too prosperous and therefore must be laundering money.  Of course IMI wasn’t and have since been cleared. The files have yet to be returned.  There are always rumors of warrants out for our arrests made worse by the fact that one of our staff  had already been the victim of one false arrest. If that weren’t bad enough corrupt government officials continue to try to confiscate the entire City of Refuge for thier own use.  We are striving to comply with every regulation.  Meanwhile legal paperwork almost always gets conveniently, lost immediately before an important deadline.  There are near constant albeit ridiculous allegations of child neglect.  One of my all-time favorites was when DINAF, the Honduran social services walked by our two soccer fields, two swimming pools, a volleyball and basketball court, wrestling room,  game room, art room and music room before sitting down to tell us that we lacked sufficient recreational facilities. They gave us a deadline to rectify this or we’d be shut down.  I asked them why they spent so much time and energy harassing us when there were children eating garbage at the dump. “Honduras is a poor country.” They said. “We don’t consider poverty to be a risk factor.”

Back in the states

Tom, our founder drives around the USA to preach 27 days out of every month. He is lucky if he sleeps four hours a night and eats granola bars because he doesn’t want to waste money on food.  The other 3 days a month he spends in Honduras meeting with workers and playing with the children to remind himself why he is killing himself.  Meanwhile Teresa spends months away from home in a 10 x 10 ft bedroom and working from 8am- 2m 7 days a week trying to hold things together at the City of Refuge.

 Americans love poignancy and we have plenty of joyous stories to tell.

That said you probably won’t hear about the havoc wrought by defiant short-term missionaries or our teen age girls who go home on vacation and return pregnant.  You don’t hear the horror of children forced by DINAF to return to their mother even though she showed them their father’s dead body after her boyfriend beheaded him. You don’t hear about sexually abused boys who become predators and have to be removed after we’ve sowed into them for a decade.

You probably won’t hear about seven-year-old who heard the devil tell him to light the baby’s dorm on fire.

We would have had 10 dead children if the mission director and I had arrived on scene three minutes later than we did.  You didn’t see the bucket brigade we formed  because the fire department couldn’t get there for another two hours.  These are just a few of the challenges we’ve faced.  But the Lord has a calling on each and every one of these children’s lives, some of whom would not be alive today if they weren’t with us.  Others would have no hope of going beyond the sixth grade. In fact there are always between 40 and 60 children whose futures are at stake.  God willing there will be hundreds more soon in Sierra Leone. There are 60 – 90 Honduran employees, some of whom would be risking their lives and those of their families to illegally cross the border if the City of Refuge were to shut down.  Life is almost always chaotic and the future uncertain.  We don’t know what will happen next only that it will. And most likely it will be crazier and harder than the last. Why do we continue?  The answer is simple.

We’d rather be IN the will of God and under machine gun fire than OUT of His will on a beach in paradise.

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Even so, that certain members of the body of Christ attack and defame the ministry under which we serve is heart breaking at times.

I know.  I know, I know…Jesus said a student is not above his teacher… Mat 10:23-25 But I’ll be honest.  Sometimes the temptation to harden our hearts and retaliate can be strong.  We do our best to be Christ like, but it still hurts when the people we’d most expect to love and at least pray for us do their utmost to undermine us.  What is it that causes people to be suspicious of any good yet rarely question a bad report?

Sometimes  the only difference between secularists and some Christians is that Christians devour their brethren in the name of God.

But what does the Bible day about all this?

Phil 4:8 effectively tells us to actively, seek the good not the bad.  For example, unlike today, it was common practice in early New Testament times to take any controversial statement and search the scriptures to prove it true rather than automatically attempt to build a case against it. Acts 17:11.    You’d think so called spirit filled Christians would be keen to embrace this approach instead of the modern-day addiction to outrage.  Too often, 2 Tim 3:1-9 language like “boasters, proud, unthankful, unloving, unforgiving, slanderers, brutal, traitors, headstrong, haughty…” is more descriptive of their approach toward co-laborers in the kingdom.

Prov 18:21 says the power of life and death are in the tongue. Simply calling a brother a fool puts one in danger of Hell Fire Mat 5:21. Even so, Jesus forewarned us that there would be those who will deliver us up and even kill us in the name of serving God. John 16:2. Evangelicals commonly believe He was talking about radical Islam.

I think He was talking about us.

 

Perhaps one of the downsides to first world western financial and material prosperity is that it is all too easy to forget that “we” not “they” see as in a glass darkly.

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There are all kinds of wonderful projects being carried out in the name of God apart from the understanding “that all have become unclean and our best deeds are like filthy rags” Isaiah 64:6.  We are saved by grace through faith which is in itself a gift. That way no one can boast about what he or she has done. Eph 2:8-9 There is no valid comparison of one to another in the kingdom. Because not one of us can accomplish anything of ourselves. John 15:5 and God is no respecter of persons Acts 10:34-35.  And while the Lord does have assignments for us to complete, Eph 2:10.  Our greatest and most important witness to the world is our Love for one another. John 13:35

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Too often people in the first world prop themselves up on a proverbial pedestal and imagine themselves as saviors via their own prosperity. They subconsciously equate their prosperity with Godliness, discernment and wisdom. They commonly envision the “least of these” in the parable of the sheep and the goats Mat 25:31-46 as the suffering child in a third world dump or the homeless person on the streets. While there is some truth to this, the bible calls these people the greatest who will inherit the kingdom of God. Mat 5:3. Is it not the one with whom we are most prone to disagree and perhaps even despise the one who more accurately represents “the least of these” within the context of our own lives?

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In John Ch 4 Jesus encounters the Samaritan woman at the well.  And while people often focus on her adultery and the forgiveness of Jesus, many miss the fact that the Samaritans (some of today’s Palestinians) and Jews were and still are vehemently opposed to one another.

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The well where they sat was Jacob’s well the ownership of which was claimed by both groups.  Ironically the first thing Jesus said to the incredulous Samaritan woman was “give me a drink” which she promptly did.

Not only did she give a drink to a Jew, one regarded as “the least of the these” by her people, but she gave the drink to Jesus Himself.

One thing is certain, Jesus’s ministry is the ministry of reconciliation. 2 Corinthians 5:11-21 Do not involve yourself with those who slander and refuse to be reconciled. Have no part in ear tickling, extra biblical teachings they espouse. 2 Tim 4:3 It is crucial that we internalize that it is ONLY the death of Jesus on the cross and the blood He shed for our iniquities that makes us righteous.  It is His resurrection that gives us hope in a dying world.   What we say and do on earth is a measure of our gratitude for what He did, or it is a measure of our pride. In the end the grateful receive more to be grateful for.

The prideful almost always eat their own.

So, what does this have to do with horses and donkeys?

Well when a group of horses are attacked, they face each other and form a circle, then kick at the attacker on the outside.

 

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When donkeys fight, they form a circle, face the attacker then kick each other to death.

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You will know them by their fruit.

Don’t be a donkey.

 

Being a Missionary is…

So what’s it like; you know, this missionary thing?

Well, I’m only one guy, and while some might disagree, I’ll give you my somewhat limited view.

Being a missionary is hearing and following God’s call.  It is counting the cost and laying down in faith whatever is, for what God’s word says could and should be.   It is the willingness to be baptized by fire in ways you know could happen but maybe don’t believe ever will.  It is wrestling with choosing to trust in the words and ideas of man or God alone when the country you’re in appears to be descending into civil war.

It is asking yourself if you have what it takes to give your life for the sake of the gospel and the children in your care if that moment of truth ever arrives.

It is waking up at 4 am to worship God alone in your secret place or hitting the road at 3 to spend fourteen hours in the back of a pickup. It is laughing with Hondurans and making jokes about pain as you are deluged with inches of freezing cold rain.  It is confronting the worst poverty you’ve ever seen.  It is witnessing the best and worst in others.  It is exposing the same in yourself. It is witnessing God do genuine miracles and the fulfillment of “greater things than these shall you do.”  It is recoiling at those powered by pride, mesmerizing others with cheap grace and lies.

It is realizing that the “least of these” in Mat 25 might not be the starving child hungry for love as much as it is that charlatan you despise.

Being a missionary means seeing people joyfully come into the kingdom as they see their genuine need.  It means seeing people accept Jesus for the fiftieth time because they have learned that raising their hand is the PIN for two-legged, missionary ATMs.  It is bringing your deepest, best and most profound revelations, your testimony, your experience strength and hope to people in the midst of the most unbearable suffering you’ve ever seen.  It is confronting your inadequacies as you wonder if anything you do even matters.  It is speaking, teaching and praying to bring healing and hope.

It is the humbling recognition that you could never endure what they do and that perhaps God placed them on earth to bring healing to you.

Being a missionary is learning to stop for the one and maybe for the one who always stops for the one when you think you have more important things to do. It is accepting that different people have different giftings and not everyone believes that as much as you.  It is learning the meaning of James 1:4 and enduring the reality of the verses immediately before.  It is always seeking to honor others.

It is walking out the understanding that people don’t care what you know until they know how much you care.

It is transcending culture and language to build relationships.  It is comforting a crying child and bringing a chair to an elderly man.  It is wrestling a group of little boys in the grass. It is cutting grass with a machete instead while wishing you had a lawnmower.  It is drawing pictures and playing ball.  It is dancing like a fool during worship to model not fearing the opinions of man.  It is running in circles with fifteen little girls, desperately hungry for a father’s love, all of them vying for your arm.  It is being laughed at because the word you thought was a woman’s name actually meant feces.  It is building intimacy and trust by laughing at yourself.  It is teaching and disciplining, hoping and believing the best as the children in your care continue to grow.  It is having absolutely nothing to say as you stand before 45 children and half as many adults eagerly waiting for you to teach.

It is watching God come through to weave His own message from the words and testimonies of five-year-olds.

It is pouring into your favorites kids even though you’re not supposed to have favorites.  It means counseling and confronting sin, setting boundaries and sometimes pleading that they repent. It is weeping alone when your favorites, those traumatized children you’ve sown into for years become a clear and present danger to the 43 children who remain.

It is the pain of returning them to the poverty-stricken circumstances from which they came a decade before.

It is charging into a burning building to save the lives of 5-7-year olds trapped inside.  It is vomiting out the smoke you’ve inhaled while fighting the fire because there is no fire department to call. It is seeing the grace of God in action and realizing that children would be dead had they remained trapped for just a few seconds more. It is being told by a 7-year-old boy say that the devil told him to set light his mattress on fire.  It is teaching him to only listen to the voice of God and hearing him innocently say “ok I will.”

It is suspending your fear of snakes and crushing the heads of poisonous snakes that threaten the children in their dorms.

It is walking out the truth that perfect love really does cast out all fear.

It is being loved and despised by people you’ve never met. It is being persecuted for righteousness sake. It is being envied, hated and scorned by visitors and outsiders who think they know better, could’ve done better, would’ve done better than you, but have never spent a day in anything that even mildly resembles your shoes.  It is admitting that neither have you spent a day in theirs.  It is struggling, at times, to remember that everyone has a story.

It is walking out the understanding that compassion never means compromising truth as you do your best to “love the least of these”.

It means being ready for anything at any time.  It is traveling five hours through the mountains to bring powdered milk to a seven-year-old with cerebral palsy. It is making sock puppets with indigenous children and helping perform a sock puppet show about nonviolence. It is transporting a woman who was brutally attacked with a machete to a hospital the very same day. It is watching her 17-year-old son choke back tears while elevating his mother’s legs as she bleeds to death in the back of our truck.  It means praying for a miracle, for divine healing. It means believing. It means not allowing your faith to be diminished when you learn that the woman just died.  It means visiting and comforting the family when you don’t know what to say.

It means experiencing the meaning of “we see as in a glass darkly.”

It is living without electricity and water and hot water for sure.  Sometimes there’s a bucket for a shower — other times just a cup. It is being sick with the same bug over and over again sometimes for weeks at a time until you finally become immune. It means accepting that if anything really serious happens, you’ll probably be dead. It means being present within the moment and that tomorrow will take care of itself.

Being a missionary is placing your full trust in God and knowing for certain that He can be trusted.

Being a missionary can feel lonely and futile at times.   It is writing newsletters and blogs you think no one will read. It is pouring your heart and soul into making videos you hope will touch hearts and compel others to join the harvest.  It is hearing “hey- I really love your voice. You could be on the radio.”  It is wondering why so many friends and family no longer seem to care and seem to resent you now that you’re gone.  It is the shock and amazement at how many people are paying attention, how many people care and come through right at the midnight hour.

Being a missionary means learning over and over again that God is true to his word.

 

Being a missionary is having gratitude for what you are served. It is appreciating a hamburger, pizza or ice cream like never before.  It is seeing that a lot if not most people in the body of Christ are simply repeating the lessons learned by Solomon in the book of Ecclesiastes.

Being a missionary is a shortcut to the truth in chapter 12.

It is loving, praying, feeding, blessing, laughing, trusting, weeping, sometimes wanting to scream or do worse in your rage.  Being a missionary is the willingness to be broken because brokenness is the sand in which the Pearl of Great Price is polished and found.

Being a missionary means being a “little Christ”- a Christian.

 

 

Huaorani, Teromanane, and the Depravity of Man. Pt. 1

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The depravity of man is both the most empirically verifiable statement and also the most intellectually resistant.

-Malcolm Muggeridge-

 

In October we were blessed with the opportunity to travel, all expenses paid, to Ecuador where among other things we got to meet and minister to the people there including some of the Huaorani (Wowrani) people.

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The movie “The End of the Spear” is the story of Jim Elliot and his friends who were martyred at the hands of Huaorani warriors, a previously untouched people in the Ecuadoran Amazon valley in 1956.

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It is also the story of their surviving widows who forgave and ministered to the Huaorani people and led many of them to Christ.  It is one of the most powerful contemporary stories of faith, forgiveness and the gospel of Jesus Christ walked out.

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If you’ve seen the movie then you know that the spearing of Jim Elliot and his friends was provoked by a lie on the part of a woman who was trying to distract others and avoid responsibility for her own actions.  In a nutshell, she had an agenda that she advanced by manipulating the emotions of her own people and sacrificed the lives of innocent well-meaning people like pawns in a chess game.

Given the emotional response, I would wager to say that were it not for the faithfulness of Elizabeth Elliot and the other wives whose lives were firmly rooted Christ and his word, most if not all of the relatively small number of Huaorani might have been killed in a retaliatory action by western colonists

The Huaorani became increasingly Christ-centered after 1956 yet a group of them rejected Christ in favor of their old traditions and they formed a separate clan known today as the Teromanane. Relations between the two clans were strained to say the least.

Still, the Teromanane were nomadic hunters and avoided the Huaorani villages.  Violence could be avoided provided they avoided each other.

The only problem is that Christianity tends to bring modernization.  That’s mostly a good thing except that the inherent greed in mankind also gets a new venue in which to express itself.

Peace with the Huaorani opened a larger door to tourism, oil exploration, and the lumber trade that in turn created a market for food previously only taken from the land for sustenance.

The food shortage caused the Teromanane to begin migrating closer to Huaorani villages in order to steal their food. Naturally, Huaorani didn’t retaliate and instead sought reconciliation with their Teromanane brothers and sisters.  They told the Teromanane they didn’t need to steal, that all they needed to do was ask and they would give them whatever they needed.  This led to more social contact to include a Huaorani man and a Teromanane woman making plans to get married.  In Huaorani culture, a man and a woman who are together alone three times are expected to get married.

Apparently, the Huaorani man changed his mind.  We don’t know what the woman said to her people. We only know that the Teromanane became so enraged that they kidnapped three young Huaorani children, took them by the ankles and beat their heads against a tree until they were dead.  Thanks to Jesus, the Huaorani had become more forgiving but not that forgiving.  They formed a raiding party, some of whom we met while we were in Ecuador and killed 15 Teromanane men and women while they slept.  Two children were alive when it was done, and the Huaorani took them back to their village and raised them.

Anyone who ran into the Teromanane got speared after that. And the Ecuadoran government shut down most of the tourist activity in the area.

 

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Fast forward to 2018 and we are with some Huaorani and other indigenous people in Ecuador.

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Actually, we were at the Ninawachi school for indigenous missionaries with a passion for bringing the gospel message and the love of God through His son Jesus Christ to their own people.  Three of these, Daeme a Huaorani native, his wife Diana, a Shuar and Priscilla an Ecuadoran colonial, were about to head into the jungle for their outreach practicum.  Priscilla who is actually one of the teachers was a little fearful because she almost died that last time she was there.

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Then we learn the Teromanane are really starving and are suddenly willing to discuss peace with the Huaorani again.  The only condition is that the kidnapped children be returned.  Everyone is hopeful including the Ecuadoran military who devised a plan to fly a helicopter into Teromanane territory and lower the children down by rope.  They were that afraid.  The only catch was that someone else had to pay for it.  We were all missionaries.  We don’t have money for helicopters.

The three Ecuadoran missionaries were getting ready to head upriver when we got news that the Teromanane had arrived just outside of the Huaorani village where they were going.  The situation was tense.  Once again two or three Huaorani women who were on fire for the Lord had gone out to meet them.  But it seemed to go well and a meeting to discuss peace was scheduled.

Unfortunately, it was time for us to return to Honduras.  All we could do was pray.  A week after we returned, we learned that the Teromanane leader turned out to be Daeme’s great uncle and Priscilla, originally scheduled to stay in the village for a week was going to stay at least a month. It sounds promising. We are waiting to hear the final outcome.

That said, I have some concerns.  The Huaorani and Teromanane have what I would call an anger addiction.

Yes, there is such a thing.

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They also like to drink Chicha a fermented drink made from yuca.

People who thrive on anger and or alcohol are volatile.

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Also, these indigenous people of the Amazon valley who probably number less than a thousand, are protected by the Ecuadoran government. They are the primary obstacle in the way of unrestricted oil drilling and lumbering in the area.  The Bible says to be aware of the wiles of the devil and Jesus told us to be wise like the serpent and gentle as a dove. One of our prayers is that they will be protected from lies and deception that would provoke their emotions, possibly amplified by alcohol and result in their wiping each other out.

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But this is not just about the history of the Huaorani and Teromanane and our experience with them.

Stay tuned for Pt. 2…

Why Outreach?

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We could give you eighteen-hundred words that might take ten minutes to read.  But we figure it might be easier and perhaps more enjoyable to watch

“Our Heart 2- Why Outreach”

Enjoy and please subscribe if you think we’re worth following.

God bless,

Brian and Cathy

 

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Toy Story 3.5ish

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While I always hope that everyone reading this blog gets something, I usually have a specific audience in mind when I write.  It could be believers or unbelievers or even a specific family member or friend that is on my mind.  This post is dedicated to the 45 plus members of the Adventures in Missions World race GAP Year, Route 6, Squad V. An inspiring group of 17 – 21-year-old men and women from diverse backgrounds who have chosen to defer their first year of college in lieu of transforming and being transformed in the name of Jesus Christ. It just so happens that we have blessed with the opportunity to coach them during their journey to four countries over the course of 9 months.

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WORLD RACE GAP YEAR V SQUAD

WALL OF PRAYER IN OUR HONDURAN TINY HOUSE

One of my first memories as a child is watching the first astronauts land on the moon on my parents 16” Zenith black and white T.V.  suffice it to say that I was hooked from the start.  I used to put on a football helmet and sit for hours in the hall closet pretending to fly the lunar module.  Alas as so many have heard me say, I really wanted to be an astronaut.  But I sucked at math. So, I became a counselor instead.

 

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In Toy Story One we see Buzz, a toy astronaut with an identity complex.  Buzz does not know he is a toy.  As the story begins we see Buzz comparing himself to, and competing with, the other characters for Andy, the toy owners, love.  Buzz denies his obvious weakness, rationalizes and justifies his failures to the point of the absurd until one day he sees himself on a television commercial and is confronted with truth.  Never the less he seizes upon his powers of denial, pulls himself together and once again tries to fly only to fall with less style than ever and loses an arm.

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In the next scene we see a broken and dejected Buzz drinking Darjeeling tea with a bunch of headless dolls in Andy’s sisters’ room.  His friends try to rescue his shattered self-worth but to no avail.  Buzz must go through the fiery process of transformation and discovery of his true identity.  Fast forward tot eh conclusion, we see Buzz rallying a bunch of broken toys to overcome the wiles of the evil Sid and save the day. In the end He becomes a real super hero but within the context of brokenness and in partnership with those who had also be broken.

That said, I am Buzz Light Year – Space Ranger.

Cathy loves horses.  So much so that she used to pretend she was a horse when she was little.  Even now everything stops the moment Cathy comes near a horse. Horses are everywhere in Honduras so that happens a lot.  She could have married a rancher or a cowboy.  Lucky for me she chose a wanna be astronaut instead.

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Jessie the Cow Girl a.k.a. Cow girl Cathy does not come on the scene until after Buzz’s identity crisis in Toy Story 2.  She appears to be looking for love in all the wrong places and is a bit fearful and claustrophobic until she comes into her own.  She then shows herself to be the most courageous, kind, loyal and helpful to others.  Those are just a few of Cathy’s qualities.  By the end of Toy Story 3 Jessie appears to be developing the hots for Buzz.

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Here begins our story.  Toy Story 3.5ish and beyond.

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We will not attempt to tell the whole story here.  Adventures in Missions blogs tend to be short.  So, we’ll save that for the future book that so many have encouraged us to write.

 

We Just Might…

 

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Instead we thought we would simply bullet point some fruit of a few of the transformative lessons that we’ll call needless pain avoidance/soul – spirit hacks that we have learned along the way, specific points that we think might be of help to the members of our squad whom we have already grown to love.

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1. It is easy to confuse the living God with our perceptions of the living God.

2. It is even easier to confuse our identity with our perceptions of ourselves.

3. Ideas, diagnoses, personality profiles and tattoos are not identities. Neither are feelings.

4. Many people believe they are worshiping God and are worshiping themselves.

5. The voice of God will never contradict His word or His character.

6. Truth and love can not be separated.

7. Truth is absolute. Happiness is relative. Joy is eternal and rooted in truth.

8. Faith (Revelation Faith) is fuel to propel you on His way.

9. Compassion and codependency often look the same. The first is selfless. The latter is the epitome of selfishness.

10. The manifest presence of God is real. Its purpose is not for us to catch a buzz.

11. The mercy of God is frequently misinterpreted as judgment.

12. Judgment and discernment are not the same.

13. The love of God may manifest as a healing touch or a whip.

14. If you really want to grow, learn, and love; die to self and let Him resurrect you.

15. A problem can not be divorced from its root cause if a solution is to be found.

16. Selfishness and self-centeredness are the root of every interpersonal problem.

17. The easiest lie to tell is the one you tell yourself.

18. Suffering is required. Suffering has purpose.  Suffering should never be a goal.

19. To love and be loved is a basic, God given, human need. The problem lies in how we try to meet that need.

20. Nothing opens the door to deception as much as emotion.

21. Your future spouse is like a fruit ripening on a tree. Be patient.  If you attempt to pick it before it is ripe it will be bitter.

22. Sometimes our weaknesses, failures and short comings are what make us lovable.

23. If farts offend you; don’t get married.

24. Forgiveness is for, and the responsibility of, the forgiver. Only then can God heal the associated hurt.

25. We cannot give what we do not have ourselves. We cannot lead where we have not gone.

26. Books are good, but the word of God is distilled, pure truth.

27. Knowledge is not understanding. Understanding comes with time, failure and perseverance.  Wisdom comes from God as an expanded revelation of                 understanding.

28. Triumph and Disaster are imposters and “IF” by Rudyard Kipling is a good road map to maturity of the soul.

29. The top of the mountain is filled with open sky. There is a reason so many ultra-successful people commit suicide.

30. Many people spend their entire lives trying to relive and redo the Book of Ecclesiastes. You can take a short cut and skip ahead to chapter 12.

31. Salvation and sanctification are a process.

32. True identity is found in brokenness. False identity is a prerequisite.

33. People generally don’t care what you know until they know how much you care.

34. Integrity matters. Say what you mean, mean what you say, do as you say. Own your own failure to do so.

35. There is no such thing as failure only opportunities to learn and do better.

36. Every action has a reward and a cost.

37. “Fair” is a fantasy.

38. “Do the little things with radical love. The bigger things will come.”  -Heidi Baker-

39. Everyone is a leader to someone.

40. Approach determines response. If you don’t like the response, then change your approach.

41. Knowing your weakness is the best defense. You can not defend what you deny or don’t know.

42. Transparency and vulnerability are weapons. Your testimony is the nuclear option.

43. The primary purpose in any spiritual calling is for God to teach us and bring us into a deeper relationship with Himself.

44. “I struggle with comparison” can be a white washed term for jealousy, envy and covetousness. Repentance not hugs might be the better answer.

45. When scared unsure or nervous, jump into papa’s arms and allow Him to remind you who you are.

46. Forgiveness, revival and healing are preceded by repentance.

47. Men who don’t cry are wimpy or dead.

48. Obstacles and spiritual attacks are blessing markers.  The bigger the challenge the bigger the blessing on the other side.

49. “Truth is like a lion. It can defend itself.”

50. “If you don’t quit, you win!” -Heidi Baker”

Que Rompe Tu Corazon?

– What Breaks Your Heart? –

One of the most frequent questions we are asked by visitors is,

“What is it like to be a missionary?”

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To be a missionary is to pursue brokenness. It is first and foremost about love.  Love in the context of a relationship with God and with each other.  Everything we do is rooted in intimacy with Him and each other in Him. The greater the intimacy the greater our recognition of our dependence. Dependence on God is a to key success on the mission field.  It is the understanding that apart from relationship, the words “love” and “God” are meaningless.

 

Sometimes the gospel is more effectively preached with a smile, a hug or a small act of kindness that leaves people with questions rather than answers to questions they never asked.

Being a missionary means understanding that preaching a sermon and cleaning a toilet might be one in the same. 

Being a missionary means having set schedules that rarely pan out because like everyone else, missionaries are gifted and dysfunctional.  It is understanding that the patience spoken of in James 1:4 is an end and not just a means.

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Some days begin at 3 AM in the back of a pick-up truck on a muddy road in the rain and end at 10pm in the same.  Others might start at 10 and end at 3.  Sometimes we are hot, hungry thirsty and sick.  Sometimes we are cool, relaxed and full of energy.  Sometimes we have electricity and water.  Sometimes we don’t.  The periodic absence of first world comforts begets a greater sense of gratitude for the little comforts we once took for granted.

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Being a missionary means not punching a time clock

or looking for one to punch. 

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It means not coveting Friday and a bigger paycheck.  It means not working for the next vacation or retirement. It means not being afraid of being late or failing to perform. It means not being distracted by materialism, the latest styles or trends or the busyness of first world life. It means not being consumed by sports, politics and sewer-stream news.

It means keeping the eternal end in mind.

It is freedom from fear of suffering and the death that no one escapes.

Being a missionary means being willing to live in the desert, proverbial and literal rather than paradise.

Being a missionary means more than being a humanitarian.

It means honoring an old man or  shaking a hand dripping with slime at the dump knowing that you can wash your hands, but he can’t and may die because of it.

It means traveling for an entire day to hug a suffering child.

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It means paying attention to the little things, those who don’t matter to the world.

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It means understanding the words of Mother Teresa,

“the most terrible poverty is loneliness and the feeling of being unloved.”

That these words apply to eternity.

That eternity apart from God is the quintessence of loneliness.

We can tell people ad infinitum that Jesus loves them, put on our best Jesus smile and our best Jesus act in hopes that they will see Jesus in us and raise their hand at an alter call.maxresdefault We can pat ourselves and each other on the back in celebration of decisions for Jesus on a given day.

But at the end of the day it’s about us seeing Jesus in them, “in the least of these” in the ONE in front of us.Gerson2.mp4.00_00_47_03.Still010

It means staying in touch with what breaks God’s heart. 

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There is a reason that it is written twenty-three times in the New Testament that Jesus had compassion.  Compassion (literally to suffer with) is the door to God’s heart.  Knowing what breaks His heart is the key to intimacy with Him.  Intimacy with Him is the path to joy in Him.  Being a missionary is about joy. It is the freedom to follow the call of God we received as a fruit of our relationship with Him.  It is a freedom that comes with the knowledge and understanding that if we delight ourselves in Him he will give us the desires of our Heart, of His heart.  He has.

To be a missionary means to be fully human.

To be human is to be paradoxical.

The blessing is in the brokenness.

Que Rompe Tu Corazon?