To Yoga or Not

Recently I was involved in a dialogue regarding progressive Christianity, Yoga and whether or not Christians should participate in it. I’m not going to say much about yoga because yoga is not part of my worldview.

Here’s a shorter video version. That, said the text has the links.

I am a Christian

For the record this is not even about Yoga but how we reason.

The validity of any argument is always rooted in its coherence and correspondence to its stated worldview and supporting presuppositions.

The presuppositional roots of most Progressive Christian arguments are almost always found in Pelagianism and, or Pragmatism. In contrast, Biblically sound arguments are always rooted in 2 Tim 3:16 “all scripture is God-breathed…”. Hence the first key in identifying a false argument within the context of the Christian worldview is the absence of scriptural references.

A second key is found in the underlying intent of a truth claim. Is it pointing us toward greater holiness or simply easing our conscience by confirming the minimum requirements to be saved?  Some people want to get as close as possible to God. Others want to know how close they can get to the devil and still avoid hell.

In my opinion, most arguments for Yoga practice on the part of Christians are based on the latter. Therein lays the problem. People tend to focus on what Yoga or another secular practice is not. Our focus should remain on what Christianity is. But what about movies, music, and Christmas trees bro?  Well, what about them? The leaven of Herod of which Jesus warned in Mark 8:15 represents the often very pragmatic trappings of the world. Namely depending on the material world and rooting our arguments in the natural.  It only takes “a little”. Gal 5:9

Paul was clear in 2 Cor 6:14-18 “do not be unequally yoked…what fellowship does light have with darkness…?”

Many if not most so-called “common grace”  arguments are based on the 1 Cor 8 “meat sacrificed to idols” argument, Peter”s vision in Acts 10:9-15, or 1 Cor 6:12 and 1 Cor 10: 20-23 “All things are lawful for me…”. Will people go to hell for doing yoga? Probably not. That’s really not the point. Still, context matters. “Yoga” means “unity”. The question that remains is, unity with what? We “cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons.”  1 Cor 10:21.

Why would we want to? 

Of course, there is the 1 Cor 9:22 become “all things to all men…” argument.  That’s fine if your goal is to evangelize an unreached group of yoga practitioners. Still, the question remains, who is teaching who? Are they becoming more like you or is the reverse the case?

At the end of the day we are talking about gospel integrity.

False gospel narratives always begin by minimizing, rationalizing, and justifying sin.  Ironically, these are known as “criminal thinking errors” within the realm of secular counseling. The double warning in Gal 1:8-9 should be enough to ward off any complacency in this area.

Sadly it is not.

All that being said, our first job as believers is to love God Mat 22:37-38 with all of ourselves, not just part. Then grow in our knowledge of him. 2 Pet 3:18 and obey his commandments. John 14:15, Ecc 12:13-14.

What is your position and why? Did you react based on emotion? Or did you suspend your judgment for a moment, search the scriptures and base your decision on God’s word. Remember, this is not about Yoga. It’s about how we decide.

Acts 17:11

Maranatha!

  1 Cor 16:22